b Idioms

IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
to hit a surface and rebound
Sentence 1
The ball bounced over the wall.
Meaning 2
to jump around
Sentence 2
High technology stocks seem to bounce around a lot on the stock market. That stock took a big bounce yesterday.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
the center of a target
Sentence 1
He scored a bull's eye with that shot.
Meaning 2
to win the point, to get the business deal because you were particularly effective, to say or do exactly the right thing.
Sentence 2
You scored a bull's eye with your speech. The club is going to give five thousand dollars to the literacy project.

Derivation

This expression derives from an old English sport, bullbaiting dogs try to pull a bull by his nose to the ground. Gamblers would place a bet "on the bull's eye" if he wished to make a bet. Crowns, an English coin, were used to bet so frequently "on the bull's eye that the coin itself came to be called a bull's-eye. Later, the term was applied to the black center of a target. The idiom right on the money is also derived from the ancient interchangeable use of a coin, bull's-eye and the center of a target. A sentence in this case would be: " You were right on the money with your speech."

IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
When a batter hits the ball hard up the middle of the baseball field, allowing the batter to reach 1st base safely.
Sentence 1
Derek Jeter hit a ball hard up the middle.
Meaning 2
being aggressive and direct
Sentence 2
“This wasn’t the time for compromise. With Trump and Cruz fighting for the nomination, Democrats and Obama should drive the ball hard up the middle and quit trying to be cute and clever.“ Principia in St. Louis
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
the ball has been hit in the ballpark
Sentence 1
The batter has a triple; it is still in the ball park. He hit it out of the park yesterday. He had a home run.
Meaning 2
"In the ballpark" is a common idiom used in business or politics, usually in negotiations. If a number is in the ball park, it could be considered worth negotiating. It is not a final agreement. If it is "out of the park, " it probably is not worth agonizing over to achieve a settlement.
Sentence 2
One million dollars is worth talking about. It is in the ballpark.

Derivation

The ballpark is probably derived from a baseball park.

IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
Baseball has nine innings unless the game is tied; then they go overtime. If a team is behind in the bottom of the ninth, it is their last chance to win the game.
Sentence 1
The home team was behind 3 to 2 in the bottom of the ninth. It was the team's last chance to win.
Meaning 2
It's the last chance to win.
Sentence 2
A business is trying to win a contract. Their opponents are ahead of them. They have one more chance to win the contract. It's the bottom of the ninth.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
To follow the previous batter, to be next.
Sentence 1
Mike Trout is on deck as the next batter for the Los Angeles Angels.
Meaning 2
To succeed your predecessor (the person before you).
Sentence 2
Samantha is on deck to follow George in the negotiations.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
An easy out for the opposing team; the batter hits a ball that goes almost straight up in the air and comes down for an easy catch in the infield. A fly ball is to the outfield.
Sentence 1
He swung hard and had a pop-up ending the inning.
Meaning 2
He or she made a great effort, but the result was a pop-up, and the cause was lost.
Sentence 2
Ben had a strategic theory, but it only resulted in a pop-up.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
Track and Field Sports: Raising the bar for high jumpers, for horses, or for track runners makes it more difficult. Lowering the bar makes it easier.
Sentence 1
The horses have to work harder jumping over those new bar heights.
Meaning 2
To make the job or decisions more difficult
Sentence 2
The Supreme Court raised the bar in a decision making it more difficult to show worker discrimination.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
It's your turn to hit the ball
Sentence 1
Where's the ball? It's in your court.
Meaning 2
It's the other persons decision or turn to act
Sentence 2
We can't do anymore on this project. It's in the boss' court now.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
In American football, the defensive team adds extra men to rush the quarterback. A blitz is an all-out attack. The term may have been used first by the military for offensive attacks.
Sentence 1
The Cowboys used the blitz to get to the quarterback of the Green Bay Packers. The defensive line blitzed the quarterback.
Meaning 2
Usually, used offensively as an all-out attack, but can be used defensively as in football.
Sentence 2
The Nazi Blitzgreig, a combination of light armour and men in World War II, was a "blitz" as it rolled over the lowland countries at the beginning of the war. It blitzed The Netherlands and Belgium.

Derivation

The derivation is used in the sentence above. It was a German military offensive in WWII.