w Idioms

IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
A sailing maneuver in which one boat gets between the wind and the opponent's sail, thereby slowing the boat's speed
Sentence 1
In the San Francisco America Cup matches the competing sailboats often took the wind out of their opponent's sails in order to reach a goal faster or to finish first.
Meaning 2
to thwart; discouragement
Sentence 2
Tom called my girl first and took the wind out of my sails.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
not on target or the bull's eye
Sentence 1
I aimed my arrow, but it went wide of the mark. I aimed the bombs at the munitions factory, but was wide of the mark and didn't hit it.
Meaning 2
to not achieve a goal or objective, to do less than expected
Sentence 2
I was wide of the mark on that contract. I thought we would get the bid.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
at the finish, to win by the length of a nose
Sentence 1
The horse won by a nose.
Meaning 2
to finish just a little better than the next person or business
Sentence 2
We won by a nose on that bid. We were only five hundred dollars under the next lowest bidder.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
to win a horse race with one's hands down
Sentence 1
Willie Shoemaker won the Derby hands down.
Meaning 2
to do the best one can in a competitive situation
Sentence 2
You'll get the job hands down. You're the best candidate they have.

Derivation

The jockey does not have to use the whip because the rider is so far ahead of the rest of the horses.

IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
a horse racing term for a horse that starts at the front of the pack, and finishes at the front for a win
Sentence 1
The favorite started right out of the gate in front and ended up the winner. He went wire to wire.
Meaning 2
In any competition, to start at the front and end up winning by staying at the front.
Sentence 2
McIlroy Goes wire to wire for Third Major Championship.