h Idioms

IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
The football game is almost over. The quarterback of the team is desperate. He tries at the last minute a very long pass, a Hail Mary pass.
Sentence 1
The Dallas quarterback tried a 50 yard pass, a Hail Mary pass, hoping he could tie up the game.
Meaning 2
A politician or say a business man or woman decides he is about to lose an election or an account and has a desperate strategy to get back "into the game," a Hail Mary pass.
Sentence 2
Many commentators and the electorate thought Mitt Romney's choice of Paul Ryan as candidate for vice-presidential spot on the 2012 Republcan ticket was a Hail Mary pass.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
to start with an advantage, a head before the other runners
Sentence 1
They gave him a head start, because he was so little.
Meaning 2
to begin early
Sentence 2
We have a head start, because they faxed their contract to us and mailed it to the others.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
to stay with something
Sentence 1
Hang in there. The sea is rough.
Meaning 2
to persist in doing something, to stay with something
Sentence 2
Hang in there. Staying on a low fat diet is no fun.

Derivation

The sailor, wind surfer, glider counterbalances the angle of the boat, surfboard, windsurfer by hanging out over the water.

IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
hang loose to relax
Sentence 1
Relax and hang loose as you ride the wave.
Meaning 2
to relax
Sentence 2
Hang loose about the boss' report. You're tense.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
to reach base, without being called "out," after hitting a ball
Sentence 1
Joe DiMaggio had the longest hitting streak in baseball history, fifty-six consecutive hits, a total of 91 hits, in 1941.
Meaning 2
to do well, to be recognized for something by the public
Sentence 2
You have a hit with your new spring clothing line. Madonna has had many hit songs.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
to throw a ball especially well, with a twist, curve, great speed
Sentence 1
The pitcher has something on the ball and struck out the batter.
Meaning 2
capable and skilled
Sentence 2
We should hire her. She has a lot on the ball.

Derivation

In baseball, the pitcher plays a more important role than in the English rounders from which baseball developed (The first baseball game was played in l847). By spinning the ball, usually by using saliva or spit, American pitchers could strike out batters easily. He was then said to "have something on the ball." The expression was soon used to mean anyone who is effective or skilled at what he does. In 1920 the "spitball" rule began. This stated that any pitcher putting any "foreign substance" on the ball would be suspended from playing.

IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
One's opponent has an illegal hand.
Sentence 1
I have the cards stacked against me. You've been cheating.
Meaning 2
to have a disadvantage
Sentence 2
The homeless have the cards stacked against them.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
He is next in the lineup to bat.
Sentence 1
There are two on (base) and Babe Ruth is up.
Meaning 2
He or she is next.
Sentence 2
You're up. They want you to speak next.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
a competitor in the strongest, heaviest division
Sentence 1
Joe Louis was a great heavyweight boxer.
Meaning 2
to be the most important
Sentence 2
International Business Machines is a heavyweight in the computer business.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
to entangle a boat, raft or fishing line in something,such as a part of a tree, a plant, in the bottom of a stream or lake
Sentence 1
My fishing line has hit a snag at the bottom of a stream.
Meaning 2
to be temporarily stopped
Sentence 2
We've hit a snag in the arms accord talks.