d Idioms

IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
a horse which no one thinks will win but does
Sentence 1
The odds on the dark horse were ten to one, but he won.
Meaning 2
a person or company no one thinks will win but does.
Sentence 2
President Truman was the dark horse in the 1948 election.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
a hand in card playing; one round of playing in the card game
Sentence 1
Please finish the deal.
Meaning 2
a business transaction which is being negotiated or is finished; a bargain.
Sentence 2
Let's work together on that financial deal. It's a deal.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
to distribute the cards; the dealer hands out the cards to the players
Sentence 1
Please deal the cards.
Meaning 2
to have, to do, to have business relations; to behave
Sentence 2
He deals justly with his business clients. President Bush dealt the United Nations into his invasion.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
to throw overboard
Sentence 1
Let's deep-six the treasure chest.
Meaning 2
to throw something away
Sentence 2
Let's deep-six that chapter and write a new one.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
To play defensively: a team or person tries to keep the opposing team from scoring.
Sentence 1
The team was better at defensive play than offensive play.
Meaning 2
to be defensive on a business project, a political project, in one's personal life.
Sentence 2
We better play. defensively. Think of possible questions and have the answers ready.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
to be knocked down and be unable to get up before the referee counts to ten
Sentence 1
The fighter is down and out. The fight is over.
Meaning 2
to be in a bad situation and to need help
Sentence 2
The homeless are down and out.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
referred to the wire used to mark the end of a race; now the wires are electronic
Sentence 1
They were neck and neck down to the wire.
Meaning 2
the last few minutes before something must be accomplished
Sentence 2
I'll have to stay late tomorrow to get this finished. I'm down to the wire on the proposal.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
to move back behind the offensive line in order to pass or run around the end
Sentence 1
The quarterback dropped back and passed twenty-five yards for a first down.
Meaning 2
to go back
Sentence 2
She was shy and dropped back behind the crowd.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
to make an error, to drop a ball in sports
Sentence 1
Willie Mays, who played for the San Francisco Giants, rarely dropped a ball.
Meaning 2
to blunder, to fail in some way
Sentence 2
We sure dropped the ball that time. We forgot to update our information.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
This is usually a gambling term. Opponents can roll dice to win a place on a board game, such as Monopoly or Parchessi, or to win chips and/or money in, for instance, a game of craps.
Sentence 1
I rolled the dice and came up with a lucky seven.
Meaning 2
to take a chance
Sentence 2
I rolled the dice when I moved to Hollywood hoping to get into the movies.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
The lower side or portion of something
Sentence 1
The coin flipped and landed on the downside revealing the heads side of the coin.
Meaning 2
the bad things about something
Sentence 2
The downside is the amount of money we'll need to loan.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
to go around the end of the opponent's defensive line
Sentence 1
The half-back did an end run and scored a touchdown.
Meaning 2
to go around the usual line of authority; to go around an immediate supervisor
Sentence 2
The student did an end run and went directly to the principal of the school rather than to his teacher.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
a line drawn which marks the end of a court of play
Sentence 1
Please draw the line in the sand for the beach ball game.
Meaning 2
to define a limit in anything
Sentence 2
I am going to draw the line about working more than forty hours a week.

Derivation

A form of tennis has been played by Englishmen at least since the time of Henry the Eighth of England in the sixteenth century. It probably came to court from France. In the early days lines were drawn to establish the boundaries of the court. By as early as the middle of the eighteenth century the idiom, "to draw a line" was used to mean establishing a limit for something. Also, this may have been derived from the lines drawn for the space between opposition parties in Parliament, so as to put an end to injuries from sword fights.