b Idioms

IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
Banking the ball off the side of the table into the pocket for a score. Original derivation from pool where a ball is shot indirectly into the pocket by banking it into the side wall or "bank." Also, in basketball, an indirect basket, by using the backboard for the shot into the basket.
Sentence 1
Minnesota Fats sank the ball in the corner pocket, banking it off the side rail. LeBron James banked the basketball off the backboard into the net.
Meaning 2
An indirect shot by using the backboard to score two points.
Sentence 2
The effect of Trump/s tax cuts are not directly effecting the economy; indirectly it may help. (You feed the horses hay to indirectly feed the birds.)
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
The game was postponed because of rain. (The game could be postponed for any reason, but the term is "rain check".) The rain check itself is the ticket that can be exchanged for a ticket at a later date.
Sentence 1
The Phillies' game was postponed because of rain, and the spectators were given another ticket for a future game.
Meaning 2
a postponement with a promise of a future meeting
Sentence 2
"Something has come up, and I can't make our luncheon meeting. How about a raincheck? "
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
to take water out of a boat; to parachute out of a plane that is going down
Sentence 1
Bail out the ship. We're sinking. We better bail out of the plane. We're on fire.
Meaning 2
to help, to save
Sentence 2
The government is bailing out the savings and loan banks.

Derivation

In boating or sailing the term,, bail out, is used to save the boat. In parachuting it is used to get out of the plane.

IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
place where baseball is played
Sentence 1
Let's go to the ball park on Saturday and see the Mets play.
Meaning 2
a general, rather than precise figure; a "ballpark" implies a rather large area.
Sentence 2
I need a ball park figure on what the contract will cost.

Derivation

The term ball park is derived from the time when baseball was played before a few people in parks rather than stadiums.

IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
the dog is not barking at the animal the hunter wants
Sentence 1
Jim's dog didn't tree the racoon. The racoom jumped to another tree and the dog barked up the wrong tree.
Meaning 2
to make a wrong choice
Sentence 2
The FBI agent didn't find the criminal. He was barking up the wrong tree.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
There are men on all bases except home base.
Sentence 1
The bases are loaded and their best hitter is up to bat.
Meaning 2
to have an advantage
Sentence 2
Our bases are loaded. We should win the contract. We have more money and expertise than they do.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
substitute for another batter in baseball
Sentence 1
The manager sent a left-handed batter to face the right-handed pitcher.
Meaning 2
supporting or substituting for someone in business
Sentence 2
The CEO and founder of a corporation again went to bat for his corporation in Congressional hearings.

Derivation

baseball

IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
same as "to be in the major leagues"
Sentence 1
Jackie Robinson was the first black player to be in the big leagues.
Meaning 2
to be a big shot, to be a major player, to be well-known
Sentence 2
You're in the big leagues now.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
The player must knock all numbered balls from one to seven into the pocket before the eighth ball.
Sentence 1
The six ball was behind the eight ball and it was a difficult shot.
Meaning 2
to be in a difficult or awkward situation
Sentence 2
I was behind the eight ball when the boss found out I didn't know any foreign languages.

Derivation

It is very difficult to make a shot with a ball, if that ball is directly behind the eight ball.

IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
to be below or above the standard set for a hole on a golf course
Sentence 1
He was below the par of four on that hole. He was two strokes above par on that hole.
Meaning 2
to do worse (below par or not up to par) or better (abovepar) than usual
Sentence 2
His performance was below par that night. That business presentation was above par. Good job!
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
to hit a player on his "blind-side"or the side away from which a player is looking
Sentence 1
The quarterback was blind-sided by the defensive end.
Meaning 2
to not see what is going to happen
Sentence 2
I was blind-sided. I didn't know he was going to come up with those kind of figures for the buy-out.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
to hit a surface and rebound
Sentence 1
The ball bounced over the wall.
Meaning 2
to jump around
Sentence 2
High technology stocks seem to bounce around a lot on the stock market. That stock took a big bounce yesterday.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
the center of a target
Sentence 1
He scored a bull's eye with that shot.
Meaning 2
to win the point, to get the business deal because you were particularly effective, to say or do exactly the right thing.
Sentence 2
You scored a bull's eye with your speech. The club is going to give five thousand dollars to the literacy project.

Derivation

This expression derives from an old English sport, bullbaiting dogs try to pull a bull by his nose to the ground. Gamblers would place a bet "on the bull's eye" if he wished to make a bet. Crowns, an English coin, were used to bet so frequently "on the bull's eye that the coin itself came to be called a bull's-eye. Later, the term was applied to the black center of a target. The idiom right on the money is also derived from the ancient interchangeable use of a coin, bull's-eye and the center of a target. A sentence in this case would be: " You were right on the money with your speech."

IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
a defensive maneuver where the team closely guards their opponent from baseline to baseline
Sentence 1
The Celtics were behind and put a full court press hoping to change the course of the game.
Meaning 2
an aggressive defense
Sentence 2
The Republicans in the 2016 election put a full court press on their voter base in order to win the Presidency for Donald Trump.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
A ball hit hard up the middle might score a hit, the batter reaching base safely. It also might help help a runner on 3rd score a run.
Sentence 1
Derek Jeter hit a ball hard up the middle.
Meaning 2
being aggressive rather than "cute or clever"
Sentence 2
“This wasn’t the time for compromise. With Trump and Cruz fighting for the nomination, Democrats and Obama should drive the ball hard up the middle and quit trying to be cute and clever.“ Principia in St. Louis
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
the ball has been hit in the ballpark
Sentence 1
The batter has a triple; it is still in the ball park. He hit it out of the park yesterday. He had a home run.
Meaning 2
"In the ballpark" is a common idiom used in business or politics, usually in negotiations. If a number is in the ball park, it could be considered worth negotiating. It is not a final agreement. If it is "out of the park, " it probably is not worth agonizing over to achieve a settlement.
Sentence 2
One million dollars is worth talking about. It is in the ballpark.

Derivation

The ballpark is probably derived from a baseball park.

IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
Baseball has nine innings unless the game is tied; then they go overtime. If a team is behind in the bottom of the ninth, it is their last chance to win the game.
Sentence 1
The home team was behind 3 to 2 in the bottom of the ninth. It was the team's last chance to win.
Meaning 2
It's the last chance to win.
Sentence 2
A business is trying to win a contract. Their opponents are ahead of them. They have one more chance to win the contract. It's the bottom of the ninth.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
watch the ball in a ball game
Sentence 1
"A Mets Usher for Five Decades Keeps His Eye on the Ball"
Meaning 2
stay focused
Sentence 2
There are a lot of distractions; keep your eye on the ball.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
In baseball their are four bases, 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th. Fourth base is home; if a runner gets to 4th base he scores a run. If the runner is left on third base at the end of an inning, there is no score.
Sentence 1
The batter scored a double and then stole third, but when the inning was over, he was still on third, so no run was scored for his team.
Meaning 2
To try, but not score.
Sentence 2
The young boy asked his date to the prom. He really liked her and had dated her for awhile, but the captain of the football team asked her to the prom, so the boy didn't score with her.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
To follow the previous batter, to be next.
Sentence 1
Mike Trout is on deck as the next batter for the Los Angeles Angels.
Meaning 2
To succeed your predecessor (the person before you).
Sentence 2
Samantha is on deck to follow George in the negotiations.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
An easy out for the opposing team; the batter hits a ball that goes almost straight up in the air and comes down for an easy catch in the infield. A fly ball is to the outfield.
Sentence 1
He swung hard and had a pop-up ending the inning.
Meaning 2
He or she made a great effort, but the result was a pop-up, and the cause was lost.
Sentence 2
Ben had a strategic theory, but it only resulted in a pop-up.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
Track and Field Sports: Raising the bar for high jumpers, for horses, or for track runners makes it more difficult. Lowering the bar makes it easier.
Sentence 1
The horses have to work harder jumping over those new bar heights.
Meaning 2
To make the job or decisions more difficult
Sentence 2
The Supreme Court raised the bar in a decision making it more difficult to show worker discrimination.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
Moving in small increments, for example, by stealing bases rather than hitting runs.
Sentence 1
The manager opted to pursue a small ball strategy by stealing bases, rather than trying to get several bases at a time, by home runs or extra base hits.
Meaning 2
The legislature sought to achieve their goals by proceeding incrementaly, a small ball approach, rather than through major legislation.
Sentence 2
The Democrats urged their counterparts in the Republican Party to work with them by proceeding in small steps.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
It's your turn to hit the ball
Sentence 1
Where's the ball? It's in your court.
Meaning 2
It's the other persons decision or turn to act
Sentence 2
We can't do anymore on this project. It's in the boss' court now.
IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
In American football, the defensive team adds extra men to rush the quarterback. A blitz is an all-out attack. The term may have been used first by the military for offensive attacks.
Sentence 1
The Cowboys used the blitz to get to the quarterback of the Green Bay Packers. The defensive line blitzed the quarterback.
Meaning 2
Usually, used offensively as an all-out attack, but can be used defensively as in football.
Sentence 2
The Nazi Blitzgreig, a combination of light armour and men in World War II, was a "blitz" as it rolled over the lowland countries at the beginning of the war. It blitzed The Netherlands and Belgium.

Derivation

The derivation is used in the sentence above. It was a German military offensive in WWII.

IDIOM ►
Meaning 1
The goal in bowling is to knock over as many pins as possible.
Sentence 1
She bowled a strike. She knocked over all 10 pins with the bowling ball.
Meaning 2
to make a very good impression on someone
Sentence 2
She was bowled over when I gave her a dozen roses.